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Directions: In the questions given below, a passage has been given with a number of statements in bold. These statements may/may not be correct grammatically and contextually. You are required to study each of the bold statements and choose from the options the one which contextually and grammatically replaces the given sentence best. If the given statement is correct as well appropriate, choose option E as your answer.

(A) The trade brawl between the United States and China on steel, aluminium, and other goods is a product of US President Donald Trump’s scorn for multilateral trade arrangements and the WTO. Before announcing import tariffs on more than 1,300 types of Chinese-made goods worth around $60 billion per year, in early March Trump unveiled sweeping tariffs of 25% on steel and 10% on aluminium, which he justified on the basis of national security. Trump insists that a tariff on a small fraction of imported steel – the price of which is set globally – will suffice to address a genuine strategic threat.
 
(B) Most experts, however, find that rational dubious. Trump himself has already undercut his national-security claim by exempting most major exporters of steel to the US. Canada, for example, is exempted on the condition of a successful renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, effectively threatening the country unless it gives into US demands. But there are a host of issues in contention, involving, for example, lumber, milk, and cars. Is Trump really suggesting that the US would sacrifice national security for a better agreement on these minor irritants in US-Canadian trade? Or perhaps the national-security claim is fundamentally bogus, as Trump’s secretary of defence has suggested, and Trump, as muddled as he is on most issues, realizes this.
 
As is often the case, Trump seems to be fixated on a bygone problem. Recall that, by the time Trump began talking about his border wall, immigration from Mexico had already dwindled to near zero. And by the time he started complaining about China depressing its currency’s exchange rate, the Chinese government was in fact propping up the renminbi. (C) Likewise, Trump is introducing his steel tariffs after the price of steel have already increased by about 130% from its trough, owing partly to China’s own efforts to reduce its excess capacity. But Trump is not just addressing a non-issue. He is also inflaming passions and taxing US relationships with key allies. Worst of all, his actions are motivated by pure politics. He is eager to seem strong and confrontational in the eyes of his electoral base.
 
(D) Even if Trump had no economists advising him, he would have to realize that what matters is the multilateral trade deficit, not bilateral trade deficits with any one country. Reducing imports from China will not create jobs in the US. Rather, it will increase prices for ordinary Americans and create jobs in Bangladesh, Vietnam, or any other country that steps in to replace the imports that previously came from China. In the few instances where manufacturing does return to the US, it will probably not create jobs in the old Rust Belt. Instead, the goods are likely to be produced by robots, which are as likely to be located in high-tech centres as elsewhere. Trump wants China to reduce its bilateral trade surplus with the US by $100 billion, which it could do by buying $100 billion worth of US oil or gas.
 
Predictably, China has answered Trump’s tariffs by threatening to respond to their imposition with tariffs of its own. Those tariffs would affect US-made goods across a wide range of sectors, but disproportionately in areas where support for Trump has been strong. China’s response has been firm and measured, aimed at avoiding both escalation and appeasement, which, when dealing with an unhinged bully, only encourages more aggression. 

(E) One hope that US courts or congressional Republicans will rein in Trump. But, then again, the Republican Party, standing in solidarity with Trump, seems suddenly to have forgotten its longstanding commitment to free trade, much like a few months ago, when it forgot its longstanding commitment to fiscal prudence.
» Explain it
A
The statement is incorrect because the usage of the word brawl is wrong contextually. Brawl means
a rough or noisy fight or quarrel.
 
Option B is incorrect. Race means a situation in which individuals or groups compete to be first to achieve a particular objective. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Option C is incorrect. Altercation means a noisy argument or disagreement, especially in public. This does not fit in contextually. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Option D is incorrect. Fracas means a noisy disturbance or quarrel. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Option A is correct. Dispute means a disagreement or argument. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Hence, option A is the correct answer.
» Explain it
B
The statement is incorrect because rational is an adjective, here a noun is needed. Rational means based on or in accordance with reason or logic.
 
Option A is incorrect. Rationally is an adverb. This does not fit in grammatically.
 
Option C is incorrect. Rationalizing is a Verb (gerund). This does not fit in grammatically.
 
Option D is incorrect. Rationalism means the practice or principle of basing opinions and actions on reason and knowledge rather than on religious belief or emotional response. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Option B is correct. Rationale means a set of reasons or a logical basis for a course of action or belief.
 
Hence, option B is the correct answer.
» Explain it
C
The statement is incorrect because the subject (price of steel) is singular and it does not agree with the verb (Have).

Option A is incorrect. Price cannot be plural in this sentence as it talks about only steel which is an uncountable noun. This does not fit in grammatically.
 
Option B is incorrect because of incorrect tense usage. This does not fit in grammatically.
 
Option D is incorrect because increase should be in past tense. This does not fit in grammatically.
 
Option C is correct because the subject the subject (price of steel) is singular and it agrees with the verb (Has).
 
Hence, option C is the correct answer.
» Explain it
E
The statement is correct.
 
Option A is incorrect. Surplus means an amount of something left over when requirements have been met; an excess of production or supply. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Option B is incorrect. Balance of trade: The balance of trade, commercial balance, or net exports, is the difference between the monetary value of a nation's exports and imports over a certain period. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Option C is incorrect. Opportunity does not fit in contextually.
 
Option D is incorrect. The usage of the word 'relations' makes the statement absurd. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Hence, option E is the correct answer.
» Explain it
D
The statement is correct contextually but the subject (One) does not agree with the verb (hope.)
 
Option A is incorrect. Rein in is a phrasal verb. The correct usage is rein in. Rein someone or something in means to bring someone or something under control; to slow down someone or something. This does not fit in grammatically.
 
Option B is incorrect. Reinforce means strengthen or support (an object or substance), especially with additional material. This does not fit in contextually.
 
Option C is incorrect. Rescind means revoke, cancel, or repeal (a law, order, or agreement). This does not fit in contextually.
 
Option D is correct. The subject (One) agrees with the verb (hopes).
 
Hence, option D is the correct answer.