Directions: Read the passage carefully and answer the questions given beside.

As the 23rd conference of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in Bonn shifts into high gear, developing countries including India are focussing on the imperatives of ensuring adequate financing for mitigation and adaptation. They are moving ahead with specific instruments for loss and damage they suffer due to destructive climate-linked events. India’s progress in reducing the intensity of its greenhouse gas emissions per unit of GDP by 20-25% from 2005 levels by 2020, based on the commitment made in Copenhagen in 2009, has been positive. Early studies also suggest that it is on track to achieve the national pledge under the 2015 Paris Agreement for a 33-35% cut in emissions intensity per unit of growth from the same base year by 2030, and thus heed the 2°C warming goal. Since this performance is predicated on a growth rate of just over 7%, and the parallel target for 40% share of renewable energy by that year, the national road map is clear. What is not, however, is the impact of extreme weather events such as droughts and floods that would have a bearing on economic growth. It is in this context that the rich countries must give up their rigid approach towards the demands of low and middle income countries, and come to an early resolution on the question of financing of mitigation, adaptation and compensation. Of course, India could further raise its ambition in the use of green technologies and emissions cuts, which would give it the mantle of global climate leadership.

The climate question presents a leapfrog era for India’s development paradigm. Already, the country has chalked out an ambitious policy on renewable energy, hoping to generate 175 gigawatts of power from green sources by 2022. This has to be resolutely pursued, breaking down the barriers to wider adoption of rooftop solar energy at every level and implementing net metering systems for all categories of consumers. At the Bonn conference, a new Transport Decarbonisation Alliance has been declared. It is aimed at achieving a shift to sustainable fuels, getting cities to commit to eco-friendly mobility and delivering more walkable communities, all of which will improve the quality of urban life. This presents a good template for India, building on its existing plans to introduce electric mobility through buses first, and cars by 2030. Such measures will have a beneficial effect not just on transport choices, but on public health through pollution abatement.
1
What does the author wants to convey by saying that- “The country has chalked out an ambitious policy on renewable energy.”

I. The country has planned a policy on renewable energy.
II. The country is emphasizing on renewable energy.
III. The country has shifted it’s focus from renewable energy to electric mobility.
» Explain it
C
Refer to:

Already, the country has chalked out an ambitious policy on renewable energy, hoping to generate 175 gigawatts of power from green sources by 2022.

If the country has hoped to generate power through renewable energy then there is no point to shift focus from it. Thus statement III is absurd.

The phrase ‘chalked out’ means to outline or to plan.

This makes statement II wrong as it is about focusing only and not shaping that focus. In this scenario, statement I gives the correct connotation as it implies that the country has planned to do so.

Thus statement I is true only.

Hence option C is correct.
2
Which of the following ensure(s) India to be a leader of global climate change campaign?

I. Use of green technologies.
II. Initiatives for deteriorating emissions.
III. Faster economic growth rate.
» Explain it
D
Refer to:

Of course, India could further raise its ambition in the use of green technologies and emissions cuts, which would give it the mantle of global climate leadership.

With the underlined text it is clear that statements I and II are the only factors that contribute India to be a global leader.

Statement III is not mentioned in the passage in context of ensuring India as a global leader of climate change.

Hence option D is correct.
 
3
Which of the following is true in the context of passage?

I. India has achieved a 33-35% cut in emissions intensity per unit of growth.
II. The transport carbonization alliance will improve quality of life.
III. India is focusing on importance of ensuring adequate financing.
» Explain it
B
Refer to:

Early studies also suggest that it is on track to achieve the national pledge under the 2015 Paris Agreement for a 33-35% cut in emissions intensity per unit of growth from the same base year by 2030,..

This shows that India is to achieve 33-35% cut in emissions intensity by 2030. It has not achieved yet.

Thus statement I is false.

Refer to:

..Transport Decarbonisation Alliance has been declared. It is aimed at achieving a shift to sustainable fuels, getting cities to commit to eco-friendly mobility and delivering more walkable communities, all of which will improve the quality of urban life.
It is clear from the above underlined text that it’s Transport Decarbonisation Alliance.

Thus statement II is false.

Refer to:

.. developing countries including India are focussing on the imperatives of ensuring adequate financing for mitigation and adaptation.

Thus statement III is true.

Since only statement III is true.

Hence option B is correct.
4
What is/are the factor(s) affecting economic growth of the country as per the passage?
» Explain it
A
Refer to:

What is not, however, is the impact of extreme weather events such as droughts and floods that would have a bearing on economic growth.

With the underlined text it is clear that Weather condition is the only factor that could affect economic growth of a country.

Policy framework is not mentioned anywhere in the passage. Thus will not be treated as the desired factor.

Hence option A is correct.
5
Which of the following is not true regarding the passage?

I. India’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 is based on the commitment made in Paris in 2014.
II. India has shown a drastic improvement as far as efforts on climate change is concerned.
III. 22nd conference on climate change was held at Bonn.
» Explain it
B
Refer to:

India’s progress in reducing the intensity of its greenhouse gas emissions per unit of GDP by 20-25% from 2005 levels by 2020, based on the commitment made in Copenhagen in 2009.

This makes statement I to be false.

Refer to:

The climate question presents a leapfrog era for India’s development paradigm.

This makes statement II to be true.

Refer to:

As the 23rd conference of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in Bonn shifts into high gear,..

Thus statement III is untrue.

Since statements I and III are not true.

Hence option B is correct.
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